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The Kidds Place
506 East Hastings Rd. Suite B
Spokane WA 99218

Fun & Creative DIY Halloween Costumes for Kids

* Please note all costumes are from different sources and ideas and their authors were compiled using Pinterest.

Let’s be honest, Halloween costumes can be pricey considering what you get. They are usually made with cheap fabric, purchased in a plastic bag, and never guaranteed to fit perfectly. If you are after something unique and custom, that can get even more expensive! It seems like a lot of trouble to go to for just one day. These costumes are a great way for you and your children to craft together; to create a costume designed to suit them and go easy on your wallet!


Gumball Baby

(via Costume Works)baby_gumball_machine

Purchase a soft cotton knit infant cap (found at a second hand store or online) and use a glue-gun to glue brightly colored pom-poms onto it. Try to find a red one-sy that has a turtleneck, so it gives the illusion of connecting the candy to the dispenser. Then, cutting felt into a square and a sharpie, create a $0.25 sign on the shirt and top off with black pants. There are some variations, like perhaps using a blue turtleneck instead of red or cutting out a felt $0.25 instead of drawing it on. It’s so adorable and can be used for infants and toddlers alike.

 

Cool Robot
(via Paging Fun Mums)

You will need:

a large cardboard box for the body, and a smaller one for the head (a standard shoebox would probably be the ideal size)
flexible ducts for the arms and legs (found at any hardware store)
tin foil
a box cutter
a glue gun
silver spray paint
silver face paint
2 empty 2 liter bottles

robotOptional items:
used computer parts (you can find these at a local recycling center)
printed off pictures of fuel gages
Coat buttons
any other miscellaneous objects that you would like to spray paint silver and stick to the body or helmet of the robot.

Have fun with this! Cut out a large hole at the top of the main cardboard box for the head, two smaller on each side for arms, and the bottom side completely off – this hole will be used to get the child in and out of the costume easily. Spray paint the box silver, assemble it with various buttons – customize it however you like! Then add computer parts, a fuel gage, or buttons. You can also spray paint two (2) liter soda bottles and glue them upside-down to the back to create a jet pack! Measuring your child’s arms, glue-gun two flexible ducts to the arm-holes and adjust them accordingly.

For the helmet, a similar concept applies. Make sure the lid is secured to the shoebox and then cut a hole at the bottom wide enough for it to rest on the top of your child’s head. Add buttons and paint lids to the sides with a glue gun, and then spray paint the whole thing once the glue is dry. For the legs, cut two more flexible ducts according to your child’s leg length and slip them over their pants, which looks best if the pants are black. Cover their feet in tin foil, and viola!

Unicorn
(via Craftaholics Anonymous)

kids-unicorn-costumeDoes your little one love unicorns? This one is fairly simple and yet so cute!

You will need:
A white hoodie (a pullover; no zipper)
White leggings
Glue gun
Purple, light pink, and hot pink yarn
Purple, light pink, white, and hot pink felt
Packing or construction paper
Gold ribbon (optional)

Headpiece:

unicorn horn

“For the ears, cut two ovals with two pointed edges, using white felt to the desired ear size. Do the same with the light pink felt only a half-inch smaller. Glue the pink felt on top of the white felt and then pinch one side and glue them so that the pinched end can be inserted into the head piece.”

As you can see, the ears, mane, and horn are on top of the hood. To make the horn, roll a few pieces of construction paper into a horn shape (however long or wide you would like). From there, wrap a piece of white felt around it and secure it with a glue gun. Cut the bottom off so it is flat and can sit neatly on the head. For an added flair, wrap a gold ribbon around the horn and secure it as well. For the ears, cut two ovals with two pointed edges, using white felt to the desired ear size. Do the same with the light pink felt only a half-inch smaller. Glue the pink felt on top of the white felt and then pinch one side and glue them so that the pinched end can be inserted into the head piece (see image). For the felt flowers pictured, look up felt flowers on Pinterest as there are many different tutorials to choose from.  Glue the ears on each side underneath the horn. Then along with the mane (described below) secure them to the front edge of the hood. Add the felt flowers as desired after this process.

Mane & Tail:

For the mane, take all three skeins of yarn and wrap them around the palm of your hand about 10 times. Then tie a single string around the middle to secure it tightly, and cut both ends – similar to how a yarn pom-pom is made. Continue making these over and over and tie them together until you reach desired mane length. The tail is made similarly, except the strands are much longer. Wrap these from the inside of your thumb to your elbow several times; however thick you want it to be. Then, similarly to the mane, take a single strand of yarn and tie it around the continuous loop, and then cut the opposite end of the loop so the strands dangle like a horse’s tail.

Torso:

Lastly,  cut a large oval in the light pink felt to cover the torso on the front of the sweatshirt. Glue gun it to the front, but try not to cover the openings of either sides of the front pocket.


Scarecrow
(via Costume Works)scarecrow31

This one is a great gender-neutral option for a costume and one that also does not take a copious amount of time. You will need:

Brown shoes
A plaid shirt
Overalls
Raffia
Burlap
Patches to sew on if desired

Most of these items, if not all, can be located at a Goodwill or thrift store near you.
The hat may be the trickiest part; and because it is more complex and step-by-step, we have linked a separate tutorial here. Patches can be cut into squares from scraps, or unwanted plaid shirts and sewed on as desired. The raffia should be coming out of the pant legs and the tops of the overalls to give the illusion of the scarecrow being stuffed with hay. This can be created by simply cutting the raffia into 6-inch strips and sewing them to the inside hem of the pockets and pant legs of the overalls. Once your overalls are decorated as desired, take some brown lipstick, lip-liner or eyebrow pencil and draw in a cute little nose!

 

Peacock
(via Andrea’s Notebook)

Royal Blue Tulle Spool
Teal Tulle Spool
Lime Green Tulle Spool
Brown Tulle Spool
Brown, green, blue and navy felt. Or buy an assorted pack of felt.
3/4″ non-roll elastic for the waistband
Ribbon of any color coordinating with tutu. 1/2″ is best.

The eyes of the peacock feathers are probably the most complex part of this costume, but after this it is fairly simple. First use the felt you have in various colors and cut them to match this idea: One large brown oval, one lime green and teal chestnut-shaped piece (one being slightly smaller than the other), and a Pac-Man shaped navy piece.



Using light brown thread, sew lines protruding outward from the center. Sew only the green piece to the brown piece to do this. Then proceed to stack the others from biggest to smallest on top of each other with fabric glue. Create 4-6 more or as many as desired. Attach each peacock “eye” to the ribbons cut to different lengths. (This will provide variety and depth to the tutu.)
peacock123
Before you attach them to the elastic, create the tutu next. Take your colorful strips of tulle and cut them into thick, long strips. Fold in half, and loop them around one side of the elastic (to go around the waist) and pull through – similar to a reef knot. You may do this, all around the elastic, or you may seclude it to the back to give that added peacock flared-out look. Andrea’s notebook used her darker tulle (the browns and dark blues and greens) on the outside edge of each side of the tutu, and reserved the brighter colors for the middle – probably to emphasize the feathers. When all the desired tulle has been attached to the elastic, then attach the felt peacock feathers by simply tying the ends of the ribbons to the elastic.

The tutu looks best with a royal blue shirt and black leggings. It’s so darling!peacock

What IS Gingivitis?

Did you know that every 3 out of 4 Americans experience a form of gum disease in their lifetime? Gingivitis, the most common, is a condition that encompasses the very early stages of a more severe gum disease or periodontitis. It is most quickly recognized by bleeding when flossing or brushing. Gingivitis is the number one cause of bloody gums, and should not be ignored as it is not a “normal” thing. Perfectly treatable early on, it can lead to a more serious condition (periodontitis) if neglected.

What Causes It?

Plaque is essentially a hardened film that develops on teeth, formed by bacteria. Plaque grows wherever bacteria is not being removed; which means if you do not floss, you are not getting rid of the bacteria in between your teeth!

Did you know that a toothbrush only reaches 2/3 of our mouths? That means, if a person never flosses, one third of their mouth never gets clean! Gross!

The plaque that grows between teeth release toxins into the gums which can cause an infection to develop. The infection spreads into the gums, making them red and tender. This means if you brush a little too hard one day, or floss for the first time in awhile, it can cause an instant abrasion in the gums, causing them to bleed.

Gingivitis is very prominent in children as they are still developing healthy oral hygiene habits. They are notorious for cutting corners in their daily brushing regimen. Typically children also have more of a taste for sweets. Sugar turns to acid, acid turns to plaque, and plaque seeps into the gums, causing the infection. Children and young teens are also at risk because rapid hormone changes are known to be linked to gum disease. Bruxism, or teeth grinding, is also more common with little ones, which can worsen gingivitis and is hard on the enamel and overall teeth in general. All things to be considered; that children are constantly growing and developing and that taking care of their teeth at a young age will do them favors and save them a lot of trouble later in life.

Preventionmother and daughter brush my teeth

If your kids start to see that “pink in the sink”, definitely help them out! There is a statement among experts that say children do not have the proper dexterity in their hands to brush their teeth until they can tie their shoes all by themselves. Therefore it is recommended you brush your child’s teeth for them up until the hand strength and precision is developed. Small flossers are also useful to assist you with flossing and it will also teach them to do it on their own. Flossing is probably the number one thing you can do to prevent gingivitis from happening in between the gums. Be a good role model and take care of your own mouth too. This means brushing twice daily for at least two minutes, and flossing and rinsing once daily.

 

If your child’s gingivitis condition is more severe, it may be a good idea to arrange for them to start going to a pediatric dentist, as they have more experience with little mouths and have 2-3 years more schooling than regular dentists. Teach them young, and take care of their teeth now so they do not have problems with their adult teeth later! 

Why We Grind Our Teeth: A Lifesaving Mechanism?

Bruxism

Mouth grinding is a habit that occurs during deep sleep, meaning many may be unaware that they even do it. Usually it takes a spouse or a loved one of someone that grinds their teeth to be able to notice it in the night. Also known as bruxism, this is a condition that can go unnoticed for long periods of time and is more common in children than adults.

Symptoms may include but are not limited to: tooth pain, jaw soreness or clicking, molars appearing to be worn flat, enamel wear, and headaches.

Chances are a dentist will be able to perform an examination to tell whether grinding is occurring. It is reported that over 10% of adults and 15% of children grind their teeth; yet it was not until recent years that doctors have actually discovered why.

It used to be a common misconception to link bruxism to stress or anger in the same context as we feel it during the day. Naturally, it can be a natural human response to consciously clench our teeth when we are mad or feeling intensely about something; and while this can happen while we sleep, it is found to actually be more than likely linked to what is called “obstructive sleep apnea”: a disorder that cuts off breathing for anywhere from 10-30 seconds during sleep.

How it Happens

While we sleep, we drift in and out of REM and NREM cycles. These stand for “Rapid Eye Movement” and “Non Rapid Eye Movement” which represent the depth of the levels of which the mind and body rest. As our sleep and rest deepens, all of our muscles relax completely. This includes the neck, jaw, mouth, and tongue. Now, when all of these muscles are completely slack it can actually block the opening of the trachea, closing off our airways!

To counteract this, the body is brilliantly designed to begin grinding. Why? Clenching the jaw is our body’s natural response because it tenses up muscles just enough to clear whatever is preventing air from freely passing through. When the muscles tighten, it reopens the airway!

The sudden obstruction, grinding, and then release unfortunately pulls us out of that deep sleep cycle and into the first stage of NREM (the lightest sleep), disrupting the cycle without the person perhaps even realizing it.

Despite the negativity surrounding bruxism, it is true that is could very well be preventing this form of sleep apnea and allowing air to pass through to the lungs even in the deepest sleep.

Mouth guards might seem like the best solution but in truth can actually make breathing more difficult. It would treat the symptom (teeth grinding) but it would not solve the initial problem.

Sleep apnea is often found to be more prominent in:

  • People with anxiety and depression
  • Children with ADHD and other learning disabilities
  • Children and adults who did not breastfeed as infants for very long or at all
1460577505_d9d6ba48c3_b

PC: Randen Pederson

Solutions

If your teeth grinding is becoming more of an issue, talk to your doctor about sleep apnea. When REM occurs, it is in the stages of the night where our skin and brain cells are replenished, our HGH (human growth hormone) is released, it boosts memory, and helps us burn fat. Sleep apnea disrupts this cycle which can lead to weight gain, heart disease and stroke. Children with sleep apnea were reported to struggle with hyperactivity, lack of focus, issues communicating, trouble adjusting to new environments, and in general received lower grades. Remember, just because you are getting an 8-10 hour rest does not always mean that this it is a wholesome, uninterrupted sleep. The good news is that most children outgrow their sleep apnea as well as their grinding, leaving little to no lasting damage on their teeth.

In a recent study, patients were given a CPAP machine (a treatment often used in severe cases of sleep apnea) or an oral device used to adjust placement in the mouth to make breathing easier. Not only did their sleep apnea stop, but so did the bruxism. Check for signs of your children grinding their teeth – chances are if it is a regular occurrence, they are not getting the sleep they need.

While grinding our teeth could be saving your life every night, it can have a long-term effect on one’s overall health. If you are concerned your child may have obstructive sleep apnea, or you yourself have it and you are concerned about your long-term health, talk to your doctor or pediatrician about steps you can take towards treatment.  If the grinding persists and there is a legitimate concern about worn-down enamel, talk to your dentist about a safe mouth guard he or she would recommend.

Helping Kids Deal with Bullies

Now that the school year has officially begun, some children may have a hard time adjusting to old social constructs after three long months of little to no interaction with so many peers on a regular basis. Being pushed around or teased by an older sibling is a completely different story than another student on the playground doing it. It can make the child feel threatened, unsafe, angry, and cause anxiety at the prospect of even going to school.

25% of public schools in the U.S. report that bullying happens on a daily if not weekly basis. Many children can be scared to admit when they are being bullied. This can be due to embarrassment, fear parents or teachers will not believe them, or that the bullying will get worse if the bully is provoked by getting punished for his actions.

How to Recognize the Signs

If your child is not telling you outright that he or she is being bullied, here are ways to identify it if you suspect it may be happening. Every situation is different, but a victim of bullying can be spotted if you know what to look for.

Not Eating

Anxiety can often cause loss of appetite, which can in turn lead to moodiness and fatigue. If your child is wanting to eat less or even skip meals altogether, they could be very anxious.

Evasiveness

Very few kids are truly bouncing off the walls to go to school every day. If you notice that your child is dragging their feet more than usual, or even trying to make excuses to get out of going to school (feigning sickness, intentionally missing the bus, etc), there could be something deeper than just simply not wanting to go.

Acting Out

If you find your child is being unusually harsh towards you or their siblings, and perhaps exhibiting out-of-character behavior, there is a chance they are reacting from being hurt – either physically, emotionally, or mentally, by someone they must face each day. Going to school five days a week can feel like a full-blown battle for them if this is occurring. This can force the need for them to put up a proverbial wall to guard themselves as a defense mechanism.

Remember that unprovoked cruelty, violence, foul language, name-calling, and extreme rudeness are often learned behaviors. If you aren’t teaching your kids this, they could be learning from somewhere else – i.e., from the bully or bullies that are mistreating them. Children who stand out as disobedient and disruptive are usually those that are not receiving the attention that they need.Two young girls bullying other young girl outdoors

How to Respond

If you are noticing any or all of these behaviors, approach your child in a gentle and casual manner. Sometimes asking a blatant question is not enough. A way to do this would be to perhaps tell a story of how you or a family member was bullied as a kid. This makes it feel like a conversation rather than an interrogation and may help you get to the bottom of what is happening.

If and when your child has expressed to you any of their struggles, first thank them for telling you and praise them for having the courage to say something. Contact the school counselor about their bullying policies; there is a chance that they have ways to monitor certain kids closely before disciplinary action is taken. This at least makes them aware of the situation, and helps you work together as a team instead of taking the situation into your own hands – like contacting the bully’s parents directly, you “dealing” with the bully yourself, etc. Chances are, your child is not the only victim.

How to Reconcile

The common phrase of responding to bullies is often: “Stand up to them!” Depending on your parenting style and moral leanings this can look different for everyone. Most parents will give their child permission to physically fight back and defend themselves if a bully is violent. Many say that by a simple retaliation it allows a bully to “get a taste of their own medicine.”

Some parents are more pacifistic in approaching these conflicts and will teach their child to respond in non-physical ways. In verbal fights, this could mean just saying something like, “knock it off,” “please stop,” or saying nothing at all and walking away.

To avoid bullies, teach your children the value of utilizing the buddy system. When a child is alone and isolated they can be singled out quicker and become easier to corner. This means having at least one friend accompany them to their locker, the bathroom, sitting on the bus or in the hallways – basically anywhere where authority is not constantly present.

Although, many bullies will back off if they are simply ignored. The rise they can get out of someone else may be the only gratification they seek. If a bully receives no reaction from a victim at all, the need to tease and fight is lost. However, this concept can be difficult to grasp for a lot of children, as when we are provoked defense is the natural response. It may help if there is some practice role-playing that takes place between you and your child. For example, say something to the effect of, “If ____ teases you on the playground tomorrow, what are you going to do?” These discussions can stay with the child throughout their day and help them remember what to do when they are put in certain scenarios.
Strong child with muscles drawn on chalkboard in elementary school
Each victim, parent, school, and overall situation is different, so in the event of bullying there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Whatever the case may be, bullying is not to be disregarded as something that builds character (even if this is the end result). Negativity only breeds negativity. While sure, children should learn the value of  “sticks and stones” in terms of developing thicker skin, there is something about a child feeling unsafe in an environment they spend the most time in that should not be ignored. Where the character-building comes from is the confidence you place in your child no matter what; and the safety and comfort they can receive from you even in the face of adversity.

Bad Breath – How it Happens & How You Can Stop It
Bad Breath – How it Happens & How You Can Stop It

We have all been in this situation: we are deep in a discussion with a friend, family member, co-worker, etc, and a ghastly smell wafts from their mouth. Once the smell is detected, it is hard to continue the conversation! Bad breath plagues on average 65% of Americans. For the individual in question it can be a truly embarrassing condition, and even create a fear of speaking aloud if there are no breath mints or chewing gum on hand.

In general, all bad breath is caused by an accumulation of bacteria in the mouth that is not properly removed. To contrast this idea, a similar bodily process can be found in sweat. Sweating is our body’s way of cooling us off and releasing toxins. However, when sweat is not washed off properly by bathing, it can begin to smell, and become what is known as “B.O.” or “body odor”. Inside our mouths, salivating has a similar purpose. Saliva glands in our mouths are used to wash away bacteria and continually replenish the mouth. Yet when proper oral hygiene is neglected, bacteria can flourish and the mouth can produce a nasty odor.

The Three Types of Bad Breath

1. Eating Those Potent Foods

The most obvious type of bad breath is the type that is completely situational, and that is whenever we eat something with a strong taste. Foods like garlic, onions, coffee, and certain spice-laden meals can seemingly cling to every inch of our mouths after eating them.
Luckily, a quick rinse with mouthwash or a teeth brushing can eliminate these odors fairly quickly after the fact.

2. Morning Breath

Tired man lying in bed stretching and yawning in an effort to wake up as he debates just turning over and going back to sleep in the morning

Nearly everyone has it, especially if you can be hasty in your nightly dental routine or forget to brush entirely. One of the best ways to prevent morning breath is to scrape your tongue before bed. Most bacteria that breeds overnight when the mouth is closed for up to 8 hours, and overall oral bacteria in general, can be found on the tongue. Another tip is to swish coconut oil before bed. It sounds strange, but this is actually an ancient practice known as oil pulling.

For about 15-20 minutes, swish around a tablespoon of organic pressed coconut oil and do not swallow it! It is said to “catch” bacteria and toxins in a disposable trap more effectively than an alcohol based mouthwash. For real life testimonies and the exact science, research oil pulling online. You will be astounded!

3. Halitosis

Lastly, the peskiest form of bad breath is known as Halitosis; a chronic condition that is persistent despite brushing and flossing. The cause can be trickier to locate, as there are many possibilities. If you are brushing and flossing consistently and it is not making a difference, chances are it is a problem you may have to consult a dentist about. Chronic bad breath can usually be traced back to two very broad categories: poor dental hygiene (at some point in your life), poor diet – and sometimes, both. When your daily oral regimen (brushing flossing, and rinsing) is not totally thorough on a regular basis (like remembering to brush, yet never flossing), it can lead to all kinds of dysfunction in the mouth that needs to be treated by a dentist: gum disease, cavity, tooth decay – all of which can be prevented. Diets high in sugar and carbohydrates, sugary and carbonated drinks, as well as habitual tobacco use can be the cause of most oral ailments especially when made a practice. In fact, most people that use tobacco products daily have bad breath, and if they do not have oral health issues now, chances are they will later in life! Remember to moderate your alcohol, soda, and tobacco use to only special occasions.

A healthy diet and lifestyle benefits your whole body, which includes your mouth. If you believe you may have halitosis, consult your dentist and they will be able to locate certain stages of decay or gum disease. They can also give you tips to improve your habits and specific diet changes you can make.

Overall, remember to visit your dentist twice a year, and to brush twice daily – because breath mints won’t always cut it!

Ways to Save Money on Back-to-School Shopping
Ways to Save Money on Back-to-School Shopping

Let’s be honest, back-to-school shopping may easily be the best part about going back to school! But with multiple kiddos to buy for, it can get very expensive. There’s a statistic that states an average American family can spend over $600 during this season! If you have children in college who need textbooks and dorm accessories, that could easily double. Here are some creative and cost-effective ways to make that end of summer shopping just as enjoyable.

Utilize What You Already Have

You may not realize it, but there’s a chance you already have school supplies in the house! An in-home office is a great place for kids to find old binders and folders that are never going to get used again and re-decorate or repurpose them. It can make a way to teach children how to make something their own and can even free up much-needed space in the office as well.

Trends are Fluid

If last year’s pencil box is just as functional as it was when it was first purchased, do not opt for a stylish brand new one that they are bound to get sick of in another 3 months. It’s a vicious cycle not worth getting caught up in. If it works, keep what you have. Kids can be very competitive in nature and change their minds quickly – seeing their friends have something trendier than them, trying to keep up, will just be throwing cash down the drain.

Lunchbox

Davidmerkoski – Own work

The good news is that trends tend to recycle. An example of this would be a metal lunch box. A very old design that was not really seen during the childhood of most Millennials; these have made a strong comeback in the last five years or so as a popular collector’s item.

End of Summer Sales

Before you rush to the advertised back-to-school clothing section – usually long-sleeved and autumnal in style – check out the summer clearance section first. These are going to be the cheapest because of the closing season. Kids typically wear t-shirts well into fall and even early winter, depending how they layer their clothes. The difference in style is not going to be that drastic and can be accommodated for colder temperatures. For example, if a girls’ brightly colored summer dress is on clearance, find a neutral pair of leggings that can match. Throughout the year, solid-colored layering pieces can be anybody’s best friend.

Stick to the List

Your child may want to buy extra supplies, but if they are not on the list chances are an opportunity to use them in school may never present itself. Tip: a lot of notebooks, pencils, erasers, crayons, etc, can be located at the local grocery store for much cheaper than well-known department stores. When it comes to simple school supplies, try to find as many as you can the next time you go grocery shopping. It could potentially save not just money, but time as well! If the local grocery store does not have everything you need, also check out your local dollar store. Not only do they have a wider selection, but a lot of them have fun and colorful themes.

Don’t Just Buy, Sell!

If your child does not have younger siblings or cousins of the same gender to give their outgrown clothes to, sell them online for cheap. The little extra work it takes is a win-win: you get the items out of the house to make more room and you make a few bucks. Gently used clothing, especially name-brand, can be in high demand when other parents like yourselves are trying to find cheaper clothes online. 

If you aren’t that internet-savvy, garage sales can be used to sell unwanted items and also buy used clothing. End of summer is the perfect time to hold a garage sale and to go shopping in them. If you have lots of children in your neighborhood, you might be surprised on how much you can find and sell!

Go back to school in style and save money. Regardless of house size and ages of kids, end of summer shopping can be a breeze!

Does Your Child Need Braces?
Does Your Child Need Braces?

By the ages 10-13 years old, most of a child’s baby teeth have fallen out. When the new ones grow in, they may not be ideally spaced or aligned. Whether they be for practical or cosmetic reasons, many adolescents and their parents choose to invest in braces for a child’s future smile. The need can be genetic, caused by inheriting bite or spacing problems. Sometimes it can be due to prolonged thumb sucking habits, poor nutrition, or decay. Depending on the severity of the need, your dentist may be able to recognize the early signs of a need for braces, the most common being:

  • Irregular loss of baby teeth
  • Chewing or biting difficulties
  • Teeth that meet abnormally or not at all

From this point, the matter is out of the dentist’s hands and he or she may recommend your child see an orthodontist. If these signs are ignored, they can very likely cause problems later on. These could include crowded teeth, an over or underbite, and even jaw problems. The “best age” is different for every child, but it usually falls somewhere between ages 8-14. Sometimes a parent or child may choose to schedule an orthodontist appointment if they notice crookedness that may not necessarily be causing dysfunction in the mouth but they choose to correct the problem for cosmetic reasons. If this is the case, the orthodontist will be able to determine when it is best to begin the treatment, and whether or not it can wait if it is a minor correction. In some situations, teeth can shift over time as the mouth grows to a place where the problem is not as visible.

The 4 Types of Braces

Metal or Traditional Braces

These are the most commonly seen braces in teenagers and even adults. Over the years, different designs have been developed to reduce the amount of metal used, making it less bulky, less noticeable, and more comfortable sitting inside the mouth. While they still remain the most noticeable type of braces, they are the cheapest.

 

Ceramic Braces

Designed very similarly to metal braces, but they have clear or tooth-colored brackets and even wires used to blend into the mouth. Despite this convenience, they can stain easily if not properly cared for and are more expensive than traditional braces.

 

Lingual Braces

Lingual braces are metal braces but in reverse. They attach to the teeth from the inside rather than the outside. While not directly visible, they can be uncomfortable and very difficult to clean. They do not function well for more severe cases of misalignment but are used for more cosmetic fixes. They are also more expensive.

 

Invisalign

Clear plastic similar to a mouth guard, but for alignment purposes. They are replaced every two weeks for gradual but smooth transitions. Again, Invisalign is not recommended for severe cases. They are nearly invisible and do not restrict any food or drink.  Available to teens and adults only, they remain the most expensive braces option, as well as the longest in duration.

For whatever reason you decide to invest in a beautiful smile, do NOT ever purchase “Do It Yourself” braces online and attempt to use them! These can do lasting damage and can even cause the extraction of permanent teeth which cannot be replaced! You are much better off going to a licensed orthodontist. Most are flexible and offer convenient payment plans so that a straight and happy smile is not out of reach.

Summer Fun For Kidds in Spokane & Coeur d’ Alene
Summer Fun For Kidds in Spokane & Coeur d’ Alene

Is running through the sprinklers just not cutting it? Summer opens up a whole new avenue of fun activities for children. But if your little ones are aching to see more outside their backyard, here are some awesome family fun activities happening in the area.


 

 


 

Upcoming events in Spokane, WA:

August 1st | Tennis Summer Camp

Recurring every weekday 8/1/16 – 8/26/16 8am-12pm
tennis summer campMission Park

1208 E Mission Ave
Spokane, WA 99202
509-991-0696

$35-$149

Kids 6-17 years old are invited to have fun, be active, and learn to play tennis. USTA-trained instructors use age-appropriate equipment and games to get kids moving, having fun, and learning tennis. Summer Camps provide a rotation of activities focused on tennis, movement, and off-court games. Additional activities include frisbee, multi-sports, reading, and more. All equipment is provided and sneakers are required

 

August 4th | Animals In Art
Recurring every day of the week except Monday. Through September 4th, 2016
10 am-5 pmanimalsinart_1889

$10/adults, $7.50/seniors, $5/students with ID, Free for children under 5. Half price admission on Tuesdays

Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture
2316 W 1st Ave
Spokane, WA 99201
509-456-3631

In this engaging exhibition, birds, horses, sheep, cows, bears, and more serve as the subjects of works of art from the 17th century through the late 20th century. Perennially popular as an artistic theme, animals have been depicted in works of art since pre-historic times. This exhibition examines etchings, engravings, lithographs, sculpture, oils and watercolors that depict the tremendous variety of the animal kingdom.

 

Go to Sky High!

sky-high-sports-spokane-51cdaa547f3d777fb700a8771322 E Front Ave
Spokane, WA 99202
509-321-5867
Open year round

Friday 11AM–12AM
Saturday 11AM–12AM
Sunday 11AM–8PM
Monday 11AM–10PM
Tuesday 2–10PM
Wednesday 2–10PM
Thursday 2–10PM

Kids of all ages love going to Sky High to jump around, practice tumbling, or diving into a giant foam pit. It’s great for parties or on a rainy day!


 

Upcoming Events in and near Coeur d’ Alene:

August 5th | Art on the Green
Through August 7th – All day
Free

Downtown Coeur d’ Alene & North Idaho College Campus

A marketplace, performance space and a gathering place for friends and families, this yearly event is the highlight of the summer in Coeur d’Alene. Art on the Green is held at the old Fort Sherman Grounds on the North Idaho College Campus, just a short walk from Downtown and City Park. Shuttle bus service to the west side of the NIC campus from downtown is also available during the festival. No dogs are allowed at Art on the Green.



Event_ColorRun_360x360_32516August 7th | Huckleberry Color Fun Run & Walk
11am-5pm – One day

Schweitzer Mountain Resort
10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd
Sandpoint, ID 83864
208-263-9555

You can run or walk on this super fun and family friendly course.

 

August 11th | The Little MermaidMermaid
Recurring August 11, 2016 – August 28, 2016
Thur-Sat: 7:30 pm, Sun: 2 pm

$49/adults, $42/seniors, $27/child – GET TICKETS NOW

The Kroc Center
1765 W. Golf Course Road
Coeur d’Alene, ID 83815
208-660-2958 (CdA Summer Theater)

In a magical kingdom beneath the sea, the beautiful young mermaid Ariel longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. Based on the classic animated film, Disney’s The Little Mermaid is a hauntingly beautiful love story for the ages. With music by Academy Award winner Alan Menken, this fishy fable will capture your heart with its irresistible songs. Ariel, the daughter of King Triton, wishes to pursue the human Prince Eric in the world above and bargains with the evil sea witch to trade her tail for legs. But the bargain is not what it seems and Ariel needs the help of her colorful friends to restore order in the ocean’s depths. This dangerous mission leads to a showdown between good and evil, which only love can remedy.

Triple Play

triple playPrices vary
175 W Orchard Ave, Hayden Lake, ID 83835
(208) 762-7529
Hours:
Friday 10AM–11PM
Saturday 10AM–11PM
Sunday 10AM–9PM
Monday 10AM–9PM
Tuesday 10AM–9PM
Wednesday 10AM–9PM
Thursday 10AM–9PM

Indoor water park, bowling, arcade, race go-karts, and even stay the night!

Silverwood Theme Park & Boulder Beach Water Parksilverwood
Kids (3-7): $25.00 (ages 2 and under free)
General Admission (ages 8 +): $48.00

27843 North Highway 95, Athol, ID 83801
(208) 683-3400

Hours:
Friday 11AM–8PM
Saturday 11AM–8PM
Sunday 11AM–7PM
Monday 11AM–7PM
Tuesday 11AM–7PM
Wednesday 11AM–7PM
Thursday 11AM–6PM

Over 60 rides and attractions, with 6 awesome roller coasters, 2 wave pools, loopy water slides, an amazing magic show, and endless fun!

Fun Facts About Your Smile

(Please note all facts have been taken from other online sources)

  • Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. (But that doesn’t mean we should use our teeth to open lids or packaging!)

 

  • It takes 43 muscles to frown, but only 17 to smile.

 

  • Babies in the womb start developing teeth under their gums at six weeks gestation. That’s amazing!

 

  • 78% of Americans have had their first cavity by age 17.

 

  • 51 million school hours and 164 work hours per year are lost because of dental related illness. It goes to show that brushing 2 minutes in the morning and 2 minutes at night can save a lot more time and money down the road!

 

  • There is more bacteria in a human mouth than there are people on the earth.

 

  • Kids only have 20 teeth, but adults have 32 teeth.

 

  • It is incredibly rare, but a baby can actually be born with teeth already broken through the surface of their gums.

 

  • On average, women smile 62 times a day, where the average man only smiles 8! Kids smile up to 400 times a day. Smiling relieves stress because it releases endorphins in your brain, which in turn can boost your immune system and prevent sickness!

 

  • Wisdom teeth are so named because they come in when one is “older and wiser.” 35% of people are born without them!

 

  • More people use blue toothbrushes than red ones.

 

  • 47% of people report that the first thing they notice about someone is their smile.

 

  • The tooth from an elephant can weigh up to six pounds!

 

  • The tooth is the only part of the body that cannot repair itself.

 

  • Are you left handed or right handed? Left handed people tend to chew on the left side of their mouth, while right handed people tend to chew on their right hand side

 

  • 90% of life threatening conditions have oral related symptoms. This is why it is said that flossing regularly can extend your life expectancy up to six years!

Laughing twins on the gray background

 

  • Just like fingerprints, no two people have the same exact set of teeth or tongue print. Even identical twins have different teeth!

 

  • Saliva has so many purposes. If our mouths were completely dry, we would not be able to distinguish the taste of anything.

 

  • It was common practice in the middle ages to kiss a donkey to cure a toothache.

 

  • The first bristles on toothbrushes were said to be made from cow hairs. Good thing modern day toothbrushes have nylon brushes!

 

  • When you choose to just brush and not floss, that means you are only cleaning two thirds of your tooth surface. Imagine if we only cleaned two thirds of our bodies! That could get pretty yucky over time!

 

  • You produce enough saliva in your lifetime to fill 2 swimming pools – up to 25,000 quarts!

 

  • In Italy and France, they do not have a “Toothy Fairy”, but a “Tooth Mouse.” Imagine putting a tooth under your pillow to await the Tooth Mouse!
Is Your Child Afraid of the Dentist?
Is Your Child Afraid of the Dentist?

Unfortunately, some people just don’t like going to the dentist! For children especially, just the idea of their first visit at first can be a very uncomfortable thought. Just imagining sitting in a big chair, in an unfamiliar room, having a bright light shone in their face with a stranger prodding areas of their mouth, can be frightening especially if it is a child’s first time or they have had a treatment in the past that was less-than-fun.

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Our Office

At the Kidds Place, our dentists and dental assistants are trained to make your child feel as comfortable and safe as possible during their visits with us. Pediatric dentistry is recommended for a growing child because oral health and overall health are directly linked during child development. A Pediatric dentist is required an extra 2-3 years of schooling specific to little teeth and little mouths that an adult dentist may not. Because regular cleanings can be so pertinent to a child’s quality of life, we set children overcoming their dentist fears at a high priority. Yet despite our efforts, we understand some children are more sensitive to new experiences than others.

First-Timers

It is recommended by the American Dental Association that a child have their first dentist appointment before they reach age 1 – after the first tooth emerges, but no later than their first birthday. This means that there is a chance that by the time a child is old enough to know what going to the dentist means, they may not be able to recall the experience of their first time.

Toddlers

When this is the case, remind them beforehand of their next visit with positivity. Try not to go into too much detail. If they ask a more specific question, say something like, “Doctor ____ is going to be cleaning your teeth!” If your child has reached toddlerhood and either does not remember their first visit, or it is their very first time, some experts even suggest going into the office prior to the appointment so the child will see a face they recognize at their next visit. If you call ahead, most offices will let you go in and meet the dentist that will be treating your child.

Another suggestion for parents to try at home is by doing a “pretend” examination. Place your child in a recliner, tell them to open wide, and count their teeth one at a time with the end of a toothbrush. It will acclimate them to the sensation of someone else touching their teeth.

The younger a child has regular visits to the dentist, the better. It provides a “dental home” and builds trust. It is stated that kids may go an average of ten times to the dentist before they even begin kindergarten. That’s a lot! That means they may see the dentist before age 6 more frequently than they see their distant relatives!

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Comfort and Reassurance

If your child is still uneasy, bring along an item that is calming and familiar, like a stuffed animal, to your next appointment. (Although we’re certain that once they see the inside of the Kidd’s Place, they will get distracted by all the neat stuff we have!) If it’s your child’s first time and they need a little extra comfort, it is not unheard of that the practicing dentist will allow your child to lay on your lap while they are examined if a situation calls for it.

When speaking about the dentist, even your own personal experiences, avoid using trigger words like “hurt” and “pain”, even if you are saying to your child, “Don’t worry, it won’t hurt!” Their mind will focus on the word “hurt” which can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear. Being scared of something can be a learned behavior, and if you as a parent do not like the dentist, it is best to not taint the view your child may already have or one that is being developed in their mind. Most of the time, a child’s first few visits rarely include a treatment such as a filling or a cap, especially if they have a proper dental routine at home. If a child takes good care of their teeth, normally there is nothing of discomfort to fear at the dentist. cleaning

For any additional questions or concerns, contact our office. If you are still considering our practice, read our incredible reviews of our friendly and welcoming staff. We’re voted the best by many for calming fears and positive experiences for kids!